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Windows server: "dfs namespace" and "dfs-r replication technology" limitations

dfs namespace limitations:

http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2003/techinfo/overview/dfsfaq.mspx

Microsoft Supported DFS, Offline Files, and FRS Deployments
Description Limit or Recommendation* Explanation

Number of characters in path limit
 

Fewer than 260 characters
 

Win32 application programming interfaces (APIs) have a maximum path limit of 260 characters. Applications fail when trying to access a namespace that goes beyond that limit. If the path length of a DFS namespace exceeds the Win32 API limit of 260 characters, users must map part of the namespace to a drive letter and access the longer namespace through the mapped drive letter.

Number of DFS roots per server running Windows Server 2003 Standard Edition
 

One, unless a hotfix is installed
 

Windows Server 2003 Standard Edition, is limited to one root per server. To create multiple domain-based namespaces on a server running Windows Server 2003 Standard Edition, install the hotfix described in article 903651 in the Microsoft Knowledge Base on the Microsoft Web site.

Number of DFS roots per server running Windows Server 2003 Enterprise Edition, or Windows Server 2003 Datacenter Edition
 

Varies
 

There is no limit to the number of DFS roots you can create on a server running Windows Server 2003 Enterprise Edition, or Windows Server 2003 Datacenter Edition. However, as you increase the number of roots per server, the DFS service takes longer to start and uses more memory.

Number of root targets per domain-based DFS root
 

No fixed limit
 

If you do not enable root scalability mode, we recommend using 16 or fewer root targets to limit traffic to the server acting as the primary domain controller (PDC) emulator master.

Number of links per DFS namespace
 
• 

5,000 for domain-based DFS
• 

50,000 links for stand-alone DFS
 

When the number of links exceeds the recommended limit, you might experience performance degradation when making changes to the DFS configuration. For stand-alone DFS, namespace initialization after server startup might also be delayed.

Size of each DFS Active Directory object (applies to domain-based DFS namespaces only)
 

5 megabytes (MB)
 

The size of the DFS Active Directory object is determined by the number and path length of roots, links, comments, and targets in the namespace. We recommend using no more than 5,000 links in a domain-based namespace to prevent the DFS Active Directory object from exceeding 5 MB. Limiting the size of the Active Directory object is important because large domain-based DFS configurations can cause significantly increased network traffic originating from updates made to those roots, links, and targets.




DFS-R replication technology limitations and a summary that's not so hard to read

https://blogs.technet.com/filecab/archive/2006/02/09/419181.aspx

http://blogs.technet.com/filecab/archive/2005/12/12/Understanding-DFS-Replication-_2200_limits_2200_.aspx


1) JetDB has a limit of 32TB; assume that ~1/4 of the total size is used for IDs of files and stuff, the maximum size is: 23.5TB.  This is theoretical limit of the size of the files that can be contained in a replicated folder.  Note that the Windows Storage team reports only testing 1TB.
2) A "volume" can contain 8 million replicated files; or no limit.  Testing with 50 million files.  JetGB size limit dependent.
3) A replication group can only contain 256 members
4) Each server can only have 128 connections incoming, and 128 connections outgoing.
5) There is no size limitation... just the theoretical limit of the JetDB size and the IDs.  Increasing the staging area is a consideration when replicating huge amounts of files.


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