Home > that actively stinks > Windows Mobile: Part 4: Conclusion – Circumventing your IT department’s Reluctance to Enable ActiveSync / Getting Email on your Windows Mobile Phone

Windows Mobile: Part 4: Conclusion – Circumventing your IT department’s Reluctance to Enable ActiveSync / Getting Email on your Windows Mobile Phone

this is related to a previous post

So… your company doesn’t have any remote access method enabled? There are a few solutions for you. You can ask your IT guys to set up forwarding on your mailbox, to an outside address; you can setup an Outlook rule to forward your mail to an outside address; you can use a third-party tool to forward mail to an outside address.

Take a look at the following mobile push solutions: emoze, seven, consilient, visto.

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  1. June 29, 2008 at 12:00 pm

    Say a company has OWA enabled, but ActiveSync disabled. Would it be possible to develop a backend for something like < HREF="http://z-push.sourceforge.net/soswp/" REL="nofollow">Z-Push<> that connects with OWA and pushes email, contacts, calendars, and tasks?

  2. matt
    June 29, 2008 at 12:09 pm

    You could… you’d parse the hell out of the HTML turn around and resend mail from your phone. That’s a lot of work on your phone though.You could do the same thing… sort of like Blackberry Desktop Redirector, have the client appear to be very light. A sort of decent starting point: http://www.codeplex.com/owanotifierAnd ActiveSync emulation OTA? Oh yea… MAPI isn’t open yet or maybe ever.Well, let me know when you’re done.

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